NaNoWriMo: The Islands Beyond, Day 17… and my 100th post

Day 17

NaNoWriMo will soon be at an end. But before discussing the day’s writing, it’s worth mentioning that this is my 100th post!

I will admit that I’m looking forward to NaNoWriMo being over, but not because I have disliked the process. Posting here (even if to a largely theoretical audience!) has kept me going. I’m happy to have had a reason to keep writing. It’s also nice to look back at the stuff I’ve written so far and see some tangible ways it can be improved up.

I am currently at 28,550 words. Here’s an excerpt. It makes a bit more sense if you know that in a previous chapter, Ethan fired a flare gun into one of the pirates’ faces.

(Stephan Paquet, flickr.com)

Mr. Falco guided Calypso past the seawall with the Dagger in tow, easing her to a stop in the middle of the harbour. A small launch from the harbourmaster’s office, a dinghy with a tall triangular sail, had already set out to meet them. When it drew near, the boys recognized the harbourmaster with the long, droopy eyebrows. He called up to the Calypso.

“Who are you, and what is your business here?” he asked.

Jacques was on the lower deck with Mr. Falco. “I am Jacques Cousteau, explorer, oceanographer, and film maker. This is my captain, Mr. Albert Falco. We wish to deliver these boys safely to shore, along with their boat, which is in desperate need of repairs.”

The harbourmaster looked the boys up and down for a few seconds. He also cast a long glance back at the Dagger before speaking again.

“I remember you two,” he said. He frowned. “Looks like you banged up your boat pretty bad. What are you doing going out on the sea if you don’t know how to keep your boat from running afoul of the rocks?”

Ethan felt mad at the old man’s suggestion that it was their fault for crashing the boat. “Don’t blame us! We were being chased by men who wanted to steal our boat and sell us to the mines at Karnet’s Horn.”

The harbourmaster looked at Ethan with surprise. “Is that a fact? Can you identify the men, boy? We don’t abide pirates at Fikskoljan, and if you can remember the faces of the men what came after you, there’s a chance we can bring them to justice.”

Pete cleared his throat. “You might say that justice has already been served. The men who attacked us are all dead.”

“Surely you jest,” said the harbourmaster. “Why, you’re just boys.”

“Lucky boys,” said Pete.

“Yeah. Boys who know how to fire a flare gun,” said Ethan.

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NaNoWriMo: The Islands Beyond, Day 16

Day 16

The weather’s been changing here, and the air is becoming dryer and cooler. Unfortunately, I inherited from my mother a head like a barometer, and when the weather changes drastically, it often results in a unique type of pressure headache. Today, I’ve had a migraine whispering at the back of my skull since breakfast.  I’m afraid it took a toll on my writing.  I called it a day with just 200 words written.  However, I did manage to chart out the next portions of the story a bit more. Hopefully, with a day to rest and plan, I’ll get a lot done tomorrow.

My word count sits at 27,300, which is about 630 words ahead of “par” for Day 16. So far, I’ve been posting excerpts, but today’s can hardly be called an excerpt. It’s practically all I wrote!

(from debbiepokornik.com)

For the second time that day, the Dagger was underwater. The boys looked down at the outline of the hull in the dark water. Pete let out a long sigh.

“Well, this sucks. What are we going to do now?”

“Isn’t it obvious?” asked Ethan. “We go talk to the Governor.”

Pete smiled. “Nice to hear you be the one to suggest it for a change. So, do we just leave the boat here?”

“You have a better plan?”

“No. Alright, let’s go.”

NaNoWriMo: The Islands Beyond, Day 15

Day 15

Saturdays are a mixed blessing. They provide way more opportunity to write than a weekday, but because everyone else is also free, there’s much more potential for being sidetracked. Some diversions are welcome, of course, like the opportunity to play Settlers of Catan (Cities and Knights expansion) with my wife and boys. (I won!)

I ended today at 27,100 words. Here’s an excerpt:

Calypso’s Denise (from natgeocreative.com)

The young bearded man’s face appeared at the hatch above. “All set to go,” he said.

“Take her down,” said Jacques.

He closed the hatch and sealed it by twisting a wheel. The submersible lurched, and then it was lifted up off the deck by the crane. When it hit the water, the windows went dark, and Jacques switched on the headlights and took the controls. A greenish glow shone through the windows and they began moving through the water. The boys pressed their faces against the narrow circles of glass, but saw nothing but light.

Then, as the submersible slowed, a dull white shape could be seen in the gloomy water. They followed the curving outline of the hull until they reached the transom, with the word Dagger written on it. The boat was hung up on a shelf of rock that jutted out into the channel. Her sails fluttered lazily in the current like enormous pieces of kelp. Here and there, a silver fish darted to escape the unfamiliar glow of their headlights.

Jacques eased the craft towards the bow, where a large gash could be seen in hull. He whistled through his teeth.

“That’s a nasty hole,” he said.

“Can you fix it?”

“Perhaps. But it will take time. This current makes things tricky.” He moved the controls, and the submersible backed away from the hull, leaving it once more in darkness. “I’m afraid it will have to wait until tomorrow. There are only a few more hours of daylight, and we cannot risk working in the dark.”

NaNoWriMo: The Islands Beyond, Day 14

Day 14

Today I blitzed the NaNo quarterback and flattened him to the turf, figuratively speaking. I got off 3200 words. Very satisfying.

Jacques Cousteau

Jacques-Yves Cousteau – Underwater Explorer, Pipe Smoker, and Temporary Guest in the Islands Beyond (josephcrusejohnson.blogspot.com)

I wrote most of my stuff in a notebook before copying it into my computer document. It was an interesting exercise, and one that I ought to do more often, as I find that it gets me thinking in different directions than when I am working on the computer. I am much less inclined to micro-edit my writing when I can’t simply hammer on the backspace key. The annoying part is when it comes time to copy the text from the notebook into a computer document, mostly on account of the fact that I don’t have a convenient way to position the notebook. I am thinking of building a little stand that I can place between me and the laptop.  I’ll post a picture if I ever build it.

So, today the boys wrecked their sailboat, and it now lies flooded at the bottom of Bromyv Strait. Lucky for them, Jacques Cousteau steams into the channel with the RV Calypso a few minutes after the wreck. Although Monsieur Cousteau never went missing (that we know of), I have taken the liberty of snatching him from our world for a while. He’s just too useful (and too snazzy with that pipe and red toque) to stay put.

Today ended at 25,600 words. Here’s an excerpt:

“Ethan, we’re sinking!”

“I know! We need to get to shore.”

He tried to steer the Dagger towards the rocks once more, but with her hull filling with water, she was sluggish and unresponsive. Waves were washing over the deck, but the nearest rocks were still a few yards off.

“Get up to the prow,” said Ethan.

Pete ran, but Ethan lingered a few moments to undo the halyards that held up the mainsail and the other sails. The booms fell to the deck with a thump and were buried beneath a heap of sailcloth.

Water was soaking into Ethan’s shoes as he ran to join Pete at the bow. The stern was mostly underwater now, and the rest of the boat would follow quickly. They were coming up on a broad, flat rock. Everything beyond it was sharp and steep, and would be impossible to jump onto without breaking their bones.

“Pete, follow me. Aim for that rock!”

Ethan ran a few steps and jumped, knowing that his life depended on it. He landed squarely on the rock, falling hard onto his elbows and knees. He tried to ignore the pain, and rolled out of the way. A second later, his brother landed beside him, groaning with pain.

“Ugh. My elbows!”

“Never mind that,” said Ethan. He pointed at the water. “Look!”

Just the bowsprit and mast of the sailboat were out of the water now. The current appeared to be tipping it onto its side, until just the tip of the mast could be seen, poking up like the branch of a submerged tree.

The boys were silent for a long time before Pete finally spoke.

“What are we going to do now?”

Ethan didn’t answer. He gazed across the channel, first at the swiftly moving water and then at the cliffs beyond it. They were sitting in the shadow cast by rocks that loomed up high over their heads, impossible to climb. They were trapped on the flat stone, with no food or shelter from the wind, and no hope of getting their boat back.

They sat back to back, trying to trap a little warmth between them, but they were soon shivering anyway. When his butt had gone completely numb, Ethan stood and began stomping warm blood back into his toes. He scanned the dark rocks and the lip of the cliff high overhead.

“There’s no point sitting here on this rock until it gets dark,” he said finally. “I’m going to climb up there and see what’s up top.”

“But Ethan—”

“Don’t try to stop me.”

“But Ethan—”

Ethan spun on his brother, cold and angry. “You think I want to climb up there?”

“No! Look!”

Pete pointed down the channel in the direction they had been heading. A ship was approaching. It was long and white, with a black stripe just above the waterline. There was a small yellow helicopter parked at the front of the top deck, and the word Calypso was written on it. A blue, white and red flag fluttered above the deck that Ethan felt pretty sure was French.

The boys shouted and waved their arms, trying to get the ship’s attention. When the ship was nearly alongside them, it let out a long blast from its horn that echoed from the walls of the channel. They’d been seen.

NaNoWriMo: The Islands Beyond, Day 13

Day 13

I did not post about NaNoWriMo yesterday because I went to bed early. Really early!  In total, I got 10.5 hours of much needed sleep. I suppose there had been one too many late nights of writing.

Thankfully, before Morpheus snatched me away, I got to 22,400 words. Here’s an excerpt:

“Excellent.” Tapper Tom clapped a hand on each of the boys’ shoulders and smiled. “Well, best of luck to you both. I’m sure we’ll meet again soon.”

He shot a glance at his companion, who, for the first time, smiled, revealing a row of yellowed teeth. The boys climbed aboard the sailboat, and the men untied the ropes from the dock. Ethan felt incredibly self-conscious as he and Pete fumbled with the mainsail cover. Thankfully, they managed to get it off without too much difficulty.

Ethan remembered how to hoist the sail, pulling on the two halyards and tying them to the cleat so that they wouldn’t slip, but he wasn’t sure about what do next. He tried to think back to what Henry had done. Not surprisingly, Pete seemed to know what to do, and he stepped in and took over the operation.

The wind was mild and blew gently from the direction of the inlet. They would need to sail into the wind, tacking in a zig-zag pattern to reach the open sea. Pete let the boom come across the deck until it caught the wind, and then tied off the mainsail sheet. The boat began moving away from the dock, leaving the men and the town behind.

After they had passed between the vessels anchored in the harbour and were safely past the seawall, they put up the staysail and the jib. Yesterday, with the wind coming across and from behind them, they had not needed to do any tacking. At first, the boys found it challenging to keep adjusting the sails every time they changed directions, but after a while they got the hang of it.

At the mouth of the inlet, the wind direction changed, blowing up from the southwest. The boys could now run at a broad reach, and only had to trim the sails every so often. They sat side by side in the cockpit in silence, staring at the rocky coastline and the waves that moved across the surface of the water. Pete was quiet for so long that Ethan began to wonder if he was refusing to speak to him.

Ethan finally asked, “You’re not still mad at me for telling you to shut up back at the tavern, are you?”

Pete looked a little surprised. “Oh. No, I was just thinking.”

“About what?”

“Well, I guess it’s kind of dumb, really.” Pete hesitated. “It’s just that guy who was with Tapper Tom. He really creeped me out.”

“Me too.”

“Actually, Tapper Tom creeps me out as well,” said Pete.

“Why? After all, he helped us by paying the slip fee.” In spite of this, Ethan couldn’t explain why it was that he agreed with his brother.

“Yeah, I know.” Pete shrugged. “It just seems like he has some reason for acting so friendly.”

That’s exactly what it seemed like, thought Ethan with a shiver. Tapper Tom seemed like the kind of guy who helped people because he expected to get something out of it in return.

“Well, it doesn’t matter now,” said Ethan. “We’re on our way to find Dad, and we’ll never see him again.”

An Actually Helpful Pep Talk

I admit that I am generally nonplussed by pep talks. Ever since high school pep rallies, since football games doomed to be lost to teams with more money to spend, the cheerleaders have rolled out (sometimes literally) from all quarters, hoping to inspire us about something. “You Can Do This!”

Well, November is National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo), and right about now, on Day 13, some people can use a shot in the arm to keep them going. The pep talks are wriggling up from between cracks in the sidewalk. I’ve read a few, and the general theme is much like the tagline of NaNoWriMo itself: “The World Needs Your Novel”. Only trouble is, the world’s never gonna get your story if you’re so darn tired and frustrated with writing that you walk away from it halfway. Perhaps the story has stalled. Some useful kickstarters to get the story moving again might be needed.

This morning I read a post by Tamora Pierce on the NaNoWriMo website that was one part pep talk, and two parts useful kickstarters. In addition to encouragement, she offered some very practical suggestions for ways that you, the author, can get your story moving again.

Here are her main points:

  1. Try adding something short. (A sudden injection of randomness.)
  2. Try something surprising, painful, or frightening to jolt your character into behaving violently.
  3. Try something small. (A mysterious object, a talisman, etc.)

The second point may be the most enduringly useful. In a recent post, fellow blogger, Charles French quoted Mark Twain, saying:

“Put your characters up a tree, and throw stones at them.”

Fun advice any day.

For Tamora’s article, see here. But if you’d rather skip the pep talk and go find some stones right away, then be my guest.

NaNoWriMo: The Islands Beyond, Day 12

Day 12

I’m happy to say that today was easier than yesterday. I succeeding in executing a major plot transition with an acceptable level of awkwardness. (The level of awkwardness that can be ironed out in later drafts.) The brothers are now off on a wild goose chase that will result in disappointing misadventures, only to find themselves right back where they started.

I also elaborated more on a fun aspect of the story. It’s taking place in a world that some people from our world end up in when they go missing (especially after ship or plane wrecks). I was able to work in a bunch of characters that are well-known examples of that from our world. Henry Hudson is an example, although I introduced him to the story several chapters ago.

I ended the day at 20,820 words. Here’s an excerpt:

Pete returned with a bowl of oatmeal, an egg, and a cup of milk. The oatmeal was beginning to cool, and so it was a little lumpy, but it was drizzled with honey, so it still tasted good. The egg Ethan hardly tasted at all, because he ate in just two bites. But the milk tasted strange, not like what he was used to back home.

“It’s sheep’s milk,” said Pete. “The cook told me there’s a pasture further up the valley, and they keep a flock of sheep on it. I’ve never had sheep’s milk before.”

“Me neither.” Ethan took another sip. “I don’t think I like it.”

“I didn’t like it at first either, but after the first few sips, it’s not so bad.”

Ethan shoveled the rest of the oatmeal into his mouth and slugged the milk so that he wouldn’t have to taste it. He slammed the empty mug onto the table and stood.

“Come on, let’s go out to the boat. We need to find Dad. Who knows how long it will take us to reach the mining town that Tapper guy was talking about?”

Pete looked at the floor a moment before speaking. “Yeah, about that. Ethan, I was thinking some more about what Enoch said—”

Ethan didn’t give him a chance to finish. “Oh, come on Pete. You were right beside me the whole time last night. Nobody we talked to had seen Dad, and there was nothing on the noticeboard.”

“But we only talked to two people.”

“Fine. Well, what about the noticeboard? How do you explain that?” He glared at Pete, as if daring him to answer.

“Maybe Dad never came inside the tavern,” said Pete. “Maybe he went up to the Governor’s house right away.”

Ethan didn’t try to hide the irritation he felt for his brother at that moment. Sometimes it seemed as if Pete went out of his way to disagree with him on everything, no matter how big or small. Maybe, thought Ethan, Pete was just jealous of him for being the older brother. Maybe Pete thought that if he made a fuss and put up a big enough stink, he could get his own way. Well, it wasn’t going to work.

“Oh shut up, Pete. Let’s just get back to the boat.” He thought of a line he’d heard in a movie they’d watched with Dad a few weeks earlier. “Come on, we’re burning daylight.”

A glance in Pete’s direction, and Ethan knew he’d hurt Pete’s feelings. His brother looked as if he might start to cry. For a moment, Ethan considered saying that he was sorry, but then he decided against it. Pete would just start yammering about going to see the Governor again, and they’d be right back where they started. He started for the door, and Pete followed.